The UMB Pulse Podcast

UMB Council for the Arts & Culture

December 16, 2021 Jennifer Litchman, MA and Nancy Gordon Season 1 Episode 12
The UMB Pulse Podcast
UMB Council for the Arts & Culture
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) is filled with artistically talented people, as well as art patrons of our local venues. To share what the UMB Council for the Arts & Culture is up to, we chat with Jennifer Litchman, MA, senior vice president for external relations; Nancy Gordon, executive director of protocol and special events; and our very own Dana Rampolla, the creative director and managing editor of 1807, our annual art and literary journal (3:07). Get a scoop on the return of the Neighborhood Spring Festival (8:52), a new mural on Greene Street (12:32), 1807 exhibits (16:21), performing arts partnerships (19:02), and the Artists’ Alliance (27:18). Thank you for listening this semester. Remember to take “The UMB Pulse” survey (32:18)!

Jena Frick:

You're listening to the heartbeat of the University of Maryland Baltimore, the UMB Pulse!

Charles Schelle:

Happy Holidays Pulse Pals. I'm Charles Schelle.

Dana Rampolla:

I'm Dana Rampolla.

Jena Frick:

And I'm Jenna Frick.

Charles Schelle:

You know what I love about this time of year? All those holiday movies, the songs, the displays, and I think we're seeing some of that vibrancy returned to the streets of Baltimore and in theaters around the area. And I am heading up to New York City you know, the Great White Way and Broadway. I'm not seeing a show though. But there's just a pep in your step when you're in New York City. You know your smile is a little bit wider. The storefronts are decorated. Christmas tree at Rockfeller Center is up, people are lined up as well to see the Rockettes show

Dana Rampolla:

Puts you in the mood.

Charles Schelle:

It puts you in the mood even if you don't want to do any of those things. It's just around, it's nice ambience. And do you realize there's a Broadway production of "A Christmas Story?"

Jena Frick:

Yep.

Dana Rampolla:

I did. I was going to see it.

Jena Frick:

Yeah, they did a they did a live broadcast of the stage version. I think it was either NBC or Fox like a couple I have a leg lamp. years ago. My Maya Rudolph played the mom. They do a leg lamp tap dance. It's wild. Do you?

Dana Rampolla:

Yeah, that's my husband's favorite Christmas movie.

Jena Frick:

I got one for my dad for Christmas one year,

Charles Schelle:

And they do the frozen tongue scene too?

Jena Frick:

They do. Yeah

Charles Schelle:

Well, the reason I bring that up is that the national tour is stopping at the Hippodrome Theatre. And we're actually going to be talking about the Hippodrome Theatre and all the cool things are that are back on stage and back in person live.

Jena Frick:

Yes, that's right. And amid all of the future and present doctors, nurses, pharmacists, lawyers, dentists, and social workers here at UMB. We also have a lot of artists and artwork to be experienced. We're going to be talking all about that today. Here on our episode, we will have Jennifer Litchamn and Nancy Gordon here to tell us all about the UMB Council for Arts and Culture. We'll touch on all the things that you might already know like 1807 and the Artists' Alliance, and talk about public art projects in the works on campus and the University of Maryland Baltimore's partnerships with the Hippodrome, Everyman Theater and CenterStage. Our own Dana will actually be pulling double duty later in this episode as a host and as a guest. She will be interviewing herself today about 1807.

Dana Rampolla:

I hope you're kidding about that. I can do both. But seriously, I am involved with 1807 and the Artists' Alliance. So I'm very excited about this program. And we have a lot to get to. So first, let's check in with our Pulse Check.

Charles Schelle:

Not all holiday sweaters are born ugly. Some are just made that way. Create your and holiday ugly sweater at a special workshop on Friday, December 17. From 1 to 2:30pm at the UMB Community Engagement Center, and also on December 17. At the CEC, they will host a holiday family movie night starting at 6pm. To register for both of those events, visit this episode's chapter markers. And that is your Pulse Check. From singers and songwriters to photographers and forgers and so much more, the University of Maryland Baltimore is filled with artistic people. So joining us to talk about you and be in the arts, our Senior Vice President for External Relations, Jennifer Litchman and executive director of protocol and special events, Nancy Gordon, and our very own Dana Rampolla, who is UMB's director of integrated marketing, as well as creative director and managing editor of 1807. So welcome, everybody.

Jennifer Litchman:

Thank you. Happy to be here.

Charles Schelle:

So Jennifer, we'll start with you. UMB is not considered a liberal arts school, of course. But that doesn't mean you can't find great artists and creative people here. So how did you UMB decide to embrace its vibrant artists community?

Jennifer Litchman:

Well, it all started probably about 8, 10, maybe even years ago with our first strategic plan. And in the So, the UMB Council for Arts and Culture, can you tell us a town hall meetings that were undertaken for that plan. A lot of our faculty, staff and students bemoaned the fact that this was a almost like a commuter campus and that you came in the morning did what you needed to do, and you left in the afternoon. And people were looking for outlets, to be creative, to find reasons to stay on campus, to collaborate with their colleagues, and to find some additional meaning to their day-to-day life here at UMB. So as an outgrowth of that, Nancy and I started putting our heads together to talk about how we could bring arts and culture to the university and what that would look like. And what it ended up looking like was the Council for the Arts and Culture and all of the fun things that we undertake on behalf of the university to bring arts and culture to faculty, staff and students and provide opportunities for them to find it externally with our partner organizations. little bit about what that is and what it does here on the university? Nancy, I'll go with you first, Nancy

Nancy Gordon:

Thanks. The Council fon Arts and Culture was established

Jennifer Litchman:

2015

Nancy Gordon:

2015. Okay, so we're going into our seventh year, we have a representative from each school and department on campus, as well as the leaders of the shared governance bodies, and we collaborate with our partner institutions. Our mission is to bring the arts to the university community, including some of our neighbors that are here. And we've formed really nice relationships with the Hippodrome Theatre, with Everyman Theater, with Center Stage, and I really had some nice programs that we can go into in more detail.

Jena Frick:

This council has brought a whole bunch of great things to the university, we it showed us that we have lots of different artists all around the university and the university community. And it kind of all starts at the top right after his inauguration. I think the whole campus knows now that Dr. Bruce Jarrell, is a blacksmith. And there's a wonderful video about it showing just how he creates his art.

Jennifer Litchman:

Well, that's absolutely true. And if you've been over to the Campus Center, you'll see that embodied in in the window at the top of the second floor. He had fashion from the actual original fence from Davidge Hall, the wrought iron fence. He and a colleague from the Ukraine, a gentleman named Anatoly collaborated on that for a very long time, in order to create the beautiful window covering that you see there now. In addition, he has also created the mace holder for the university mace and for the School of Nursing mace. So he's also created the UMBrella awards for the UMBrella organization, annual awards. And he has created all kinds of other iconic materials to represent the university to internal and external stakeholders.

Charles Schelle:

I think at one point, maybe after he retires, maybe one day, you could probably have a touring exhibition of all of his art around campus,

Jennifer Litchman:

I'm not sure we have a space large enough for that.

Charles Schelle:

Like, you know, like a guided tour. Different stops,

Nancy Gordon:

Scavanger hunt.

Jena Frick:

Actually, that'd be great, a scavenger hunt of all of his work. Good, because he has made a whole bunch of stuff for the university, you just rattled off a whole bunch of things.

Jennifer Litchman:

He has an actually I sort of feel like with Bruce, he is...his true love, I think is his art. It's more than just his avocation. It's certainly more than a hobby. And it's fitting because he's a surgeon and surgeons work with their hands. And obviously iron work is working with his hands

Dana Rampolla:

Well he spoke recently about how it's almost therapeutic, it's a calming thing for him to get up at 4am and go out into his shop before he even begins what most would consider his real day.

Jennifer Litchman:

Well, and I would imagine this case, that same could be said for the other artists here at the university. Particularly those who were at the frontlines during COVID when they needed to find an outlet not that they had much time because COVID -- fighting COVID was such a 24/7 endeavor. But for those who could whittle out just a little bit of time to calm their minds. I think that art was probably a lifesaver for many of them.

Jena Frick:

Absolutely. Using that left side of the brain and you know, giving the right side a little bit of a rest. Another Council for Arts and Culture initiative is the West Baltimore Neighborhood Spring Festival. It's been on hiatus due to COVID. Right. But I hear that there's plans coming up for it to be happening this year.

Nancy Gordon:

Yes, there are mark your calendars for May the 7th. It's a Saturday and we are going to use the parking lot of at the corner of Poppleton and Baltimore streets, which is catty corner from the CEC. Miss First Lady Yumi Hogan is our honorary chair of the Arts Council. And she initiated this endeavor probably about five years ago. And we bring in all types of entertainment from Zumba from our West Baltimore community folks to taekwondo to Korean dancers in their full costumes. We have food we have a DJ. We have art vendors that we typically have at our Arts Festival. The holiday craft fair in December, many of them participate in May at this festival.

Charles Schelle:

Is that typically a free festival?

Nancy Gordon:

Absolutely, totally free. Right.

Charles Schelle:

And you also mentioned Yumi Hogan as the honorary chair, talk a little bit about some of the perspective and contributions she's made.

Jennifer Litchman:

So Mrs. Hogan, for those of you who aren't aware, is a painter. She's a water colorist. And she has been on the faculty at MICA for a number of years. And so we invited her back the beginning of the Arts Council to be our honorary chair. We didn't think for a minute she'd accept. We hope that she would. And to our surprise and great pleasure she did except so she has been a very hands on coach, Honorary Chair of the Council, in addition to this neighborhood festival. She also has been instrumental in helping us with our 1807 Arts and Literary Journal. And as well, she has also been very supportive of all of the work that the Arts Council has done. And in addition to being supportive of the Council and the work that we do, she is also connected us to some of the other arts organizations in the state.

Jena Frick:

Yeah. And you mentioned she's hands on and when you say hands on she really is. When you all do murals in some of like the West Baltimore partner schools that we have, she is there with a paintbrush and her smock just right alongside the students and staff just ready to go

Jennifer Litchman:

She's actually the one who connected it to our muralist Candace Brush. Her last name is fitting for an artist. She had recently graduated from the University of Maryland College Park and Mrs. Hogan had worked with her on a mural over in West Baltimore, not affiliated with us. So she and Candace and the Arts Council work together and we have three city school murals now at James McHenry, Southwest Baltimore Charter School and over at Renaissance, and Candace worked with the students to come up with what the design would be. So Mrs. Hogan, Dr. Perman, at the time, and all of the students at each of the schools then spent a couple of hours painting in the rest of the mural.

Jena Frick:

Yeah, and there's a really great video and photos and stuff on UMB's website of that particular event and all the other murals. So definitely go check that out. And speaking of murals, Nancy, I know that there is a another mural coming soon on Greene Street, right?

Nancy Gordon:

Yes, there is a competition going on. We've had, I believe three nominations, of a large mural that will be painted on the side wall on the corner of Lexington and Greene streets, that hopefully will add a beautiful scenario for everyone coming down Greene Street, we have a special subcommittee on the council, that is reviewing the nominations. And hopefully we'll have something going up in the spring.

Charles Schelle:

Can't wait. It's nice to have another little space just to relax on campus, you know, between classes or meetings or wherever you are,

Jena Frick:

Even if you're just walking or having lunch,

Nancy Gordon:

Some nice color, you know, in that area.

Charles Schelle:

Absolutely. Now, earlier in this podcast season, we talked about 1807. But there is a new issue out. So Dana, talk to us about what the new issue includes and remind us a little bit about what 1807 is.

Dana Rampolla:

Okay, well 1807 is an anthology curated, edited and produced by members of the UMB community. So faculty, staff, students, alumni, as well as our community, neighbors here in West Baltimore all have the opportunity to contribute to the journal. The way that you become a part of this is each fall we open submissions, they're usually open for about a month, five to six weeks, if necessary. And those people are all invited to submit artwork, which will then be published in the journal. Submission does not guarantee publication. Of course, there is a review board. And that's where the Arts Council comes in. We have editors who serve in that capacity. And we review the art there's a blind jury who decides which art is included. And I would say something that I think we are all very proud of and happy about is that each year we represent a very diverse community of artists within the school and within the schools' community. We have people from all walks of life in the university who wind up submitting and are selected and it's just random and I think that's really amazing because it speaks to the artistic ability of people you don't have to have. You don't have to be a president of the universe of a university as Jennifer was detailing about Dr. geral. You can be a anyone in the in the university or in the world who can be creative and artistic so we enjoy the opportunity through 1807 to promote that art and to share it with the greater UMB community

Charles Schelle:

And what type of art is in it? There's I've seen photos and paintings and there's really some unique pieces in there.

Dana Rampolla:

Yeah, I'm glad you brought that up Charles, there's different categories that you can enter your art in. So there's writing, which is pretty obvious poetry, essays, short stories, as well as visual art. And visual art is a pretty broad category that includes art such as paintings, illustrations, drawings, digital art, photography, of course, is a category that you can enter work in. And we did open at a couple of years ago to allow for iPhone photography. And it's very interesting, because we all are carrying around these great cameras that are built right into our phone. So it's interesting to see the art that comes in and some of its really beautiful, even though it's taken with a phone, but certainly medium format, as well as SLR photography is also an option to enter. And then our last category is varied art. And this category is really interesting because it includes things like sculptures, textiles, clay works, Dr. Jarrell's metalwork, wood, jewelry, pottery, all of those types of more three dimensional art. And like I said, you can, you can grab a copy. But there's all of those different types of art that have been submitted each year, which again, speaks to the creativity in the university

Charles Schelle:

With a previous issue, you featured some of the yard, and that underpass at Pearl Street for the Pearl Street Gallery, which I think was a phenomenal success. It looks beautiful, with the lighting and everything. What other plans are in store for exhibiting some of the art find in 1807?

Dana Rampolla:

Great, well, the that first Pearl gallery was designed, as you said, with art from the inaugural issue. Now we're planning for the second version of Pearl Gallery, which will be on the opposite side of the street where the current gallery is established. And it will feature art from the second 1807 journal.

Charles Schelle:

And you also have something at the is it, Weise Gallery?

Dana Rampolla:

Yes, we have an exhibit going on right now that will be live until mid January. And there's a number of pieces of art from issue three, which was just published and just printed this past month. So that exhibit is open, it's free to visit. And it's really exciting to actually see the work that we have looked at in the journal live and in person. It's funny how sometimes you picture something in a book. And then when you get down there, it's this beautiful, massive sculpture or something that you're envisioning as a large painting, actually maybe a petite version of a painting that is featured in the gallery. So the exhibits open, we encourage you to stop by. And we look we appreciate the partnership with viously. The library HSHSL, to put that exhibit on.

Jena Frick:

So we were talking about the Pearl Gallery set up and how there's another one coming to feature the artwork in 1807. Is there going to be some sort of event or thing planned to roll out the gallery that's coming up? Because I know we had one sort of but COVID safe one for the very first opening of the gallery.

Dana Rampolla:

Yes, we will definitely do something and because hopefully these COVID protocols will continue to evolve and allow us to do more things in person. We absolutely hope to be present, live for that. And of course, we will include the artists and people, people on campus who have an interest in art.

Charles Schelle:

How do I get my hands on the new issue?

Dana Rampolla:

Thank you for asking that. Charles, we would love to have people get their hands on a copy. The easiest way to do that is to go to the UMB website. If you type in 1807 or Arts Council in the search bar on the webpage, it will take you right to the Arts Council webpage and there's information there. So you may purchase a copy, aptly priced, they're $18.07 each and they make great gifts.

Jena Frick:

I did not I know that. Yes. Funny. Yeah.

Jennifer Litchman:

And the price has not gone up in three years. Inflation not withstanding!

Jena Frick:

You would have to change the name of it.

Charles Schelle:

Well, let's transition to art on the stage performance arts. And Nancy, this is your arena. So tell us about some of the unique relationships we have with our local theatre venues.

Unknown:

Well, we have a terrific relationship with the Hippodrome Theatre, where we until COVID, hit had different programs during the day, basically Lunch and Learn where we might have one of the cast members from a current show at the Hippodrome, who would talk to us about what it's like to be on the road. Answer questions about their background about performing on the stage. We've had tours, backstage tours of the Hippodrome which are great where we start out at the loading dock and we go onto the stage we go to the lighting room, we go way up in the rafters where you can actually see how they swing the chandelier for Phantom of the Opera. It's really a lot of fun. Hopefully, we'll be able to begin those programs again, in the spring. Everyman Theatre has been wonderful to us. They offer us different programs that they have script readings, dress rehearsals, as well as tickets to a number of their performances.

Charles Schelle:

And we also have some partnerships with CenterStage and BSO. Right?

Jennifer Litchman:

We do. They also offer a reduced ticket prices. They primarily are trying to get more students involved, younger people involved. You know, I noticed when I go to the theater, it's mostly an older crowd. And while that's great, we want to sell as many tickets as we can. It's really important to get younger generations more involved in the arts. Since the Arts Council started, we've reached out to our sister universities, and we've had a long standing partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County with UMBC. They have a thriving and wonderful arts department there. And we've worked very closely with them to bring programming here to the University. For example, they sent a string quartet couple of years ago, over in the Campus Center for those who were happening to pick up their lunch or between classes could stroll by the fireplace room, and take a few minutes to just listen to some beautiful string music. We've also worked with them on what they call the Catalyst program, which is where they partner, one of their artists with one of our artists to see if that could spur more collaboration. And at the time, it was a gentleman named Lee Boot, who had created an app that you could go to a museum, and you could point your iPad at the ceiling. And it would tell you all about the fresco, for example that you were looking at on the ceiling. Lee Boot was partnered then over here at the UMB side with Bruce Jarrell, when he was provost, and he then talked about his iron work, and then he and Lee talked about ways that they could collaborate in the future. And we're hoping to bring another one of those programs back here to you and be hopefully next year, as well. We have worked with them on a really exciting project that will benefit our West Baltimore community. We the Arts Council has provided a stipend to a graduate student in the arts program at UMBC, who is in residence over at the CEC this fall. And she's talking with all the employees at the CEC as well as the community members who routinely take advantage of the programming there to develop a program that combines the arts with community building. And they have just announced that it will be a storytelling project where they will have an older member of the community paired with a younger member of the community. And they will tell each other their stories, then a few weeks or maybe months later, they'll come back and the younger person will tell the older person story back to them and the older person will tell the younger person story back to them. And then they will collaborate with a local artist, whether it is a musician, a songwriter, a playwright, a puppeteer, a dancer. The culmination event will be probably in June, at the CEC in the lower level theater stage area where the older and younger partners and the artists will then perform these people's stories back to the audience.

Charles Schelle:

That's amazing. And you never know what had happened out of those stories being shared. Just either a more community appreciation to a larger story, maybe a play. And you mentioned about you know, younger generations being involved in the theater and going to our local venues. It's not those, you know, classic plays anymore. There are a lot of contemporary plays and productions being put on and, and one that came to mind actually at Center Stage was "Thoughts of a Colored Man," which was actually written by a Frostburg State alum, Keenan Scott, and it's now on Broadway. And so you never know what passes through the stage.

Jennifer Litchman:

Well, Charles, you're so right. And one of the things that I think makes Everyman so special is that they premiere local playwrights, and they have shows that are first performed here before they go to Broadway just like CenterStage, and you'll find that they are not what you might expect from a theatre company. They are really tackling the issues of the day with a real strong focus on social equity and justice and injustice. And one of the things I think that makes performing arts so different from seeing movie is the fact that you are right there. It is three dimensional you feel it, you feel the energy you see the, you know, the the sweat, and it when you leave the theater, it really makes you think about what you just saw, in a way completely different from going and seeing a movie.

Charles Schelle:

You're so right. And whether it's those types of productions or if you want to see something Broadwayesque and can't make it to New York, the Hippodrome is the perfect place. Yuu have "Waitress" pass through and then "A Christmas Story" even has its own production.

Jennifer Litchman:

"Hairspray"

Charles Schelle:

Yeah, "Hairspray" too

Nancy Gordon:

"Dear Evan Hanson"

Charles Schelle:

Yeah, sounds

Jena Frick:

That's on my list to see!

Dana Rampolla:

"Hamilton" again

Jennifer Litchman:

"Hamilton," again,

Charles Schelle:

And a great way to see it as a UMB employee or student is to volunteer. Nancy, tell us about being an usher.

Unknown:

Yeah, there is the opportunity to usher I believe, not just at the Hippodrome, but also at Everyman and Baltimore CenterStage. A number of our people are ushers there. Our Associate Vice President, Laura Kozak serves as an usher at the Hippodrome. I know Jim Reynolds, who's in Academic Affairs, also he and his wife both.

Jennifer Litchman:

They're at Hippodrome and Everyman

Unknown:

Yes, are at both venues as ushers so it's a fabulous way to get to see performances.

Charles Schelle:

Right

Jena Frick:

And not only that, but there's also discounted tickets through UMB. Is that right?

Jennifer Litchman:

Absolutely.

Nancy Gordon:

Yeah. Now, those those change, because the discount doesn't actually come from the Hippodrome itself. Each performance, each show sets their own pricing for all of the shows. So some are great.

Jennifer Litchman:

I saw "Waitress" for $20. Yeah.

Nancy Gordon:

So he, you know, you never know what you're going to find. But as soon as we start up with all of that, now that we're back with live performances, hopefully, you'll be able to catch a lot of that on our website. And another function of the Arts Council is also to pass that information along to their constituencies, which is why we'd like to have representation from each school and each department on campus.

Jena Frick:

And one more topic to cover before we go, so u and b also has an Artists' Alliance. Dana, what is the Artists' Alliance? And how can people join?

Dana Rampolla:

Well, the artists Alliance is a group of people here who work or study at UMB. It's primarily employees, faculty, staff. And the mission of the Artists' Alliance is to be a group that is completely inclusive to people in the university. It's an opportunity to meet once a month to kind of brainstorm to navigate issues that you might have, if you are an artist. We've done a lot of really fun and interesting things. For example, we have met and discuss like how to keep our textile room organized, if we're a textile artist, we've talked about how to take good photography. So if you wanted to submit 1807, you know, how do you take a good photograph of your artwork, if you're not a photographer, we've talked about utilizing social media as a good resource for our own artistic marketing. Another fun part of being involved is that we've done, we've had conversations with musicians. So if one of us, for example, I have a son, who's a full time musician, we invited him and another member had us has a sister who was an opera singer, we invited both of them to one of our monthly meetings, and they share their experience in music in a real time way. So that was interesting. And then sometimes we'll do just little activities, we had one of our members lead us in the creation of a Mandela several months back during COVID, when we couldn't meet in person. And that was a creative experience where we all were on a zoom and we turned our cameras off for a bit and we drew this, this little creation and then shared with each other and if you're interested in that story, we wrote about it it's in The Elm if you go to The Elm and search for Mandela, or, you know, Artists' Alliance, that should likely show up

Charles Schelle:

The history of the mandalas or I've also heard it pronouncd mandalas however, you want to say it is fascinating with with Tibetan monks, and just the intricate detail because what tiny pieces have seen, right?

Dana Rampolla:

Well, no, that would probably be a mosaic. This is where you draw a circle. I mean, actually, maybe the the quote unquote, real ones are made that way. But for our purposes, we drew a circle, and then we all made very symmetrical type designs within that circle, but likely Charles is our expert.

Jennifer Litchman:

Dana, like when we were little, and we were doodling. You make all these squiggles and then you'd color them in colors.

Dana Rampolla:

Yeah, yeah, very similar.

Jena Frick:

Wow, I did not know that!

Charles Schelle:

The sand appreach I was talking about is like there's this monastery in D.C. that that does this that's been on like "House of Cards" for instance in the scene. And and when I was worked at Frostburg State, they visited the library, they were there for like a week building this and making it, they have all these little containers of like purple and orange and green and all these wonderful vibrant colors. And they're just like putting it on on, almost just like a, like a half cut straw, but it's like wooden, and you just tap, tap, tap, tap, tap, every little grain.

Jennifer Litchman:

I don't have patience for that.

Jena Frick:

Neither do I.

Charles Schelle:

Meditative, I could imagine,

Dana Rampolla:

We could not have squeezed that into a brown bag artists lunch, virtual. Right to bring us full circle. It's a terrific organization a great place if you're an artist on campus. And maybe you're a little hesitant to submit to 1807. We've had talks about, you know, what submitting means to try to allay some of you know, and nervous artists, concerns or questions about that. So it's a nice group of people. And, again, just look us up on the website.

Charles Schelle:

I can't wait for the next meeting. I could probably use a few lessons. That's for sure. So Jennifer, Nancy, Dana, thank you for coming on to the UMB Pulse and, have a safe and happy holiday break.

Jennifer Litchman:

Thank you, Charles.

Nancy Gordon:

Thank you, Charles. Thank you, Jena. Thank you, Dana.

Charles Schelle:

Well, I am all arted out if that's even a word after that conversation.

Jena Frick:

How you be arted out?

Charles Schelle:

Or arted Up? I don't know. I'm motivated, though, to see some of the the artwork and murals that we have on campus that I haven't had the chance to see,

Jena Frick:

I'm motivated to submit something for 1807.

Dana Rampolla:

That's what I'm going to ask if either of you are artists

Charles Schelle:

I could write, which is the literary part of the journal. But I do have some photos that I probably should submit.

Jena Frick:

Yeah, I have a couple pieces of like, like paintings and stuff that I'm pretty proud of. I don't know if they're art worthy. But I certainly have a lot of different short stories and things that I've written that may fit into the literary parts.

Dana Rampolla:

Well, here's a good thing to know is that you can actually enter in more than one category, you can only do five submissions for one one issue. And only one type of art can be chosen from a category. But Jena, you could enter, enter both your paintings and your written works.

Jena Frick:

Oh, there we go.

Charles Schelle:

Well, this has been an experience doing my first ever podcast for that matter. So we want to thank all of you who have listened to the UMB Pulse for this fall semester. To wind it back a little bit. This podcast was created in response to share more COVID-19 related updates. And the landscape shifted, we did have the Delta varient. But we were getting back in person. So we wanted to remind you about all the great things we could experience in person on campus like all the art that we just talked about. So we hope you enjoyed our little talk show, but we're also exploring what the UMB Pulse will look like in the spring semester. And we're looking for feedback if you want to talk about how we're going to be doing that Dana and Jena?,

Jena Frick:

Sure. So we created a little survey for anyone who's been listening anyone who has kind of listened and anyone who hasn't listened before. We would love your feedback on our show and what you're interested in listening to as far as podcasts go if you like them, what you like about them what you want to hear about them what you want to hear on a UMB podcast. We have a great survey for you all you can submit your feedback and that will be at umaryland.edu/pulse And we will also push it out on other UMB campus channels like The Elm or Campus Life Weekly and our social media so be on the lookout for that.

Dana Rampolla:

And we expect to return in January so check UMB social media for updates. The best way to know when our next episode will be airing is by subscribing. You'll get an alert from your favorite podcast player of when we're on the air.

Charles Schelle:

So for Dana, Jena and myself, thank you for listening to the UMB Pulse and have yourself a safe and happy holiday

Jena Frick:

The UMB pulse with Charles Schelle, Dana Rampolla and Jena Frick is a UMB Office of Communications and Public Affairs production. Edited by Charles Schelle. Sound engineering by Jena Frick. Marketing by Dana Rampolla. Music by No Vibe. Recorded in the University of Maryland Baltimore Community Engagement Center.