The UMB Pulse Podcast

UMB Parking and Transportation Services

August 26, 2021 University of Maryland, Baltimore Season 1 Episode 4
The UMB Pulse Podcast
UMB Parking and Transportation Services
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

The UMB Pulse talks about outdoor locations on UMB for some mask relief (00:48), The 1807 Pearl Street Gallery (01:35), the latest updates with your Pulse Check (04:23), and opens up The UMB Pulse mailbag (28:56)!  Angela Hall, director of UMB Parking and Transportation Services, joins the show. Angela goes over how parking works (12:07), the MTA Sticker Program (15:00), the UMB shuttle (17:33), Lyft programs (18:55), EV charging stations (20:04), flat tire, lockout service, and even how to borrow an umbrella or ice scraper (21:03),  tools to remember where you parked (22:50), the bicycle commuter program (25:26) and electric scooters (25:57).

Jena Frick:

You're listening to the heartbeat of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, the UMB Pulse.

Charles Schelle:

Welcome to the UMB Pulse. I'm Charles Schelle.

Dana Rampolla:

I'm Dana Rampolla.

Jena Frick:

And I'm Jena Frick.

Charles Schelle:

Our guest is UMB director of Parking and Transportation Services Angela Hall who will share so many benefits that you might not know that Parking and Transportation Services offers. That interview is time stamped in the episode description to skip ahead. UMB is also back to wearing masks indoors because of increased cases of COVID-19. Masks can be removed outdoors. We'll talk about those details in the pulse check. But speaking of removing your mask outdoors, I think more people are clamoring to run outside as soon as they can to just get some mask relief. So are there any favorite outdoor hang outs for like a moment of Zen?

Dana Rampolla:

I actually like to hang out and under the breezeway at Saratoga, there's a set of tables out there, there's some nice shade and you actually do get a little breeze every now and then it's a great spot to have lunch or even an impromptu, or a brief meeting where sound in the background doesn't matter.

Jena Frick:

Yeah, I really like going over to the the campus Plaza Park that's right in the middle of campus that they usually have the farmers market at. There's picnic tables and benches and things like that. So it's just a nice little walk to head over there. Although you may be hard pressed to find like a spot with some shade under the trees. But you know, in the fall, it's very, very nice,

Charles Schelle:

Right. You know, it's a nice shaded walk to that 1807 mural in the Pearl Street garage overpass. You know parking garages but not just for cars. Dana you actually have a close connection with this. So tell us about how that mural happened and your connection to 1807.

Dana Rampolla:

I do have a little little connection with this. So I'm the creative director and managing editor of 1807, which is UMB's art and literary journal. And quick little plug we will be accepting new entries for submission for the next issue this coming fall. But for those who aren't familiar, what happened with the first issue of 1807 is that the signage and beautification committee met and discussed how they could feature that art on campus. And the decision was made to produce an outdoor gallery. And that gallery features a handful of pieces of art that were actually published in that first edition. So I worked with Anthony Consoli and Design and Construction their department was terrific and facilitating the lighting and just the the wall setup that enabled us to apply the vinyls, we worked with a company from out in Sykesville to actually have those vinyl appliqus applied. And it's beautiful stop by and check it out. We're actually very excited because now that we're back on campus, we're actually talking about starting a second gallery wall from the second edition. So more to come on that.

Jena Frick:

Yeah, no, it's it's beautiful if you get a chance to walk by and if you check out UMB's website, we have this wonderful video of the opening of this outdoor gallery where Dr. Jarrell is there and we have a couple buses in front kind of like Extreme Makeover Home Edition and he says move that bus before we debuted the gallery. It was very cool. Definitely check it out on the UMB news website.

Dana Rampolla:

And on today's episode we'll be talking to Angela about things that happened during the pandemic. And it's interesting, Jena that you bring that up because that was a big event that we had planned that we had to migrate to a different just a different look and feel and you know, certainly limited number of people but but thank you for mentioning that it's a it's a really fun video. Dr. Jarrell was terrific.

Charles Schelle:

President Jarrell

Dana Rampolla:

President Jarrell

Jena Frick:

President Dr. Jarrell, MD

Charles Schelle:

Yes. How do I find 1807? is a printed is it online is it both?

Dana Rampolla:

Well, if you go to the UMB Council for the Arts and Culture, there's a web page dedicated to 1807. That's where you find all of your information about how to submit artwork as well as past editions. And you can order copies of them and surprise, they cost $18.07 and there's a link on the website, which will facilitate your order.

Jena Frick:

Like you did that on purpose or something

Dana Rampolla:

Real cute, right?

Jena Frick:

Yeah, as we had said at the top masks are now required indoors at UMB again, so let's break it all down in this week's pulse check.

Charles Schelle:

An indoor mask requirement is now in effect at UMB regardless of vaccination status. There are several key parts to the policy including exceptions, so please listen closely. Everyone, regardless of vaccination status must wear a mask in public indoor settings. Everyone regardless of vaccination status, must wear a mask won UMB buses or shuttles people may remove their masks when they are eating or drinking indoors inside an office laboratory or designated study area. As long as they are by themselves. A person working in a cubicle can remove their mask while seated if the following

criteria. are met:

they are fully vaccinated. The walls of a cubicle extend above the top of their head when they are seated. A cubicle wall is between themselves and other people seated in the area. No one is seated closer than six feet from them on the open side of the cubicle. A graphic to help visualize the cubicle roles is available on the UMB recovery website at Umaryland.edu/Coronavirus. Fully vaccinated staff and faculty giving in-person presentations and lectures have the option to remove their masks during the presentation or lecture as long as six feet of physical distance is between them and their audience. While eating or drinking indoors. unvaccinated people must physically distance. Vaccinated individuals are encouraged to physically distance when eating indoors. Masks are not required when people are outdoors except for at gatherings where attendees will be in fixed seating for more than 15 minutes without six feet of physical distancing. A face covering is required while exercising at URecFit and in the UMB Community Engagement Center. The complete policy and FAQ's can be found at umaryland.edu/Coronavirus. A UMB policy on out-of-state work is effective August 15. The policy addresses the risks and considerations of out of state work and clarifies that out of state work must be authorized in advance. Special considerations for telework and neighboring states to Maryland and the District of Columbia are also outlined in the policy. This policy is not intended to apply to occasional and approved work-related travel. To read the policy visit umaryland.edu and search using the keyword policies

Jena Frick:

And that's your USB pulse check.

Charles Schelle:

I hope your parallel parking skills are still sharp because it's time to hop in the car to campus again. The good news if you're not a great parker, UMB has plenty of other transportation options here to talk about that and more is UMB director of Parking and Transportation Services Angela Hall! Welcome to the show!

Angela Hall:

Thank you very much for having me.

Charles Schelle:

Thank you. So give listeners a brief overview of what you do in your role.

Angela Hall:

So I'm the director of Parking and Transportation Services here at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. I oversee the lots and the parking garages on the 77 acres of campus. We do have seven parking garages and eight lots. We have on average about 4.2 million parkers a year, we do have about 10,000 available parking spaces on campus, we not only service UMB we also service the community as well.

Dana Rampolla:

So in what ways do you actually service the community with in terms of parking?

Angela Hall:

We do offer parking not only to UMB but we do have daily parking at all of our garages which they are not restricted to just UMB so they're anyone can park to go for their medical needs or doctor's appointments, if they're going to the Ravens or Orioles games, if they're going to see a show at the Hippodrome, which will be starting actually this fall.

Jena Frick:

Funny you say that I actually just went to the Orioles game on Friday, and I used my parking spot.

Dana Rampolla:

Oh, that's great,

Angela Hall:

Very convenient. Actually, it's on the north end of campus. That way, you don't have to worry about beating all the traffic to get out of the stadium area.

Charles Schelle:

Absolutely.

Dana Rampolla:

Angela, you mentioned about coming back to campus. So what did you guys do with the onset of the pandemic related to parking and closing the garages, I know you had to cancel the shuttle.

Angela Hall:

So on the onset of the pandemic, like everyone else, we really thought it was only going to be a couple of weeks. So we really maintained status quo for a couple of weeks. And then we really did decide that the campus was empty. There are a lot of people were not coming back to campus, a lot of decisions were made that people are gonna start working from home. So we did have to, unfortunately start closing some of our garages. But by closing our garages, we did have some electrical savings, we had some staff savings. So that did parallel into some savings through the university budget, which was a positive side. So with closing all the garages and everything, we were able to actually focus on a lot of our maintenance needs of those closed garages like power washing, you know, painting, stuff like that. So it did give us a little bit of an advantage through that. But unfortunately, with the pandemic, we didn't want to see anyone go. And also unfortunately, we did have a substantial loss in revenue.

Dana Rampolla:

So we're you alluded then you weren't able to maintain a full staff, some people,

Angela Hall:

Correct as many people are not really sure or do not know that our Penn Parking is our basically our garage operator. So all the staff that you see in the blue shirts in the garages are actually Penn Parking employees, not UMB employee. So a lot of them did have to be laid off, unfortunately, because we did not have the need for all the employees and that staff has about 75 staff. And we did dwindle down to probably about 40.

Dana Rampolla:

So some of the people stayed on site, others were unfortunately let go Did any of you telework those initial months, weeks months?

Angela Hall:

Unfortunately, a lot of our staff are unable to telework because of the nature of the business. For instance, the maintenance crew cannot telework from home you cannot clean a garage working from home or auditing staff with for the garages that were open. We cannot take those tickets and everything off premises because of the legislative auditors and the items that need to be maintained and secured in the offices. So we were able to have five people work from home, which are mainly the administrative clerical positions. But for the most part, our office staff were on site the entire time.

Jena Frick:

Wow, kudos to them. That's great.

Angela Hall:

Yes ,I give a give a lot of kudos to my entire staff for staying the whole entire time, especially when there was a lot of uncertainty going on with should we mask were we masking? Are we working? Are we not working? You know, is this whole university just going to close down and we just raised the gates with the parking garages, there was a lot of uncertainty. And I do give them complete kudos, our maintenance staff actually won the champion of excellence. And they were featured on that which, you know, without really the maintenance staff and our auditing staff and our cashier staff still keeping everything running, we wouldn't been able to operate during those times.

Charles Schelle:

You have a lot of friendly employees to I remember, Dana, we were in your car. And we just had a was at the Plaza garage. It was just a very friendly employee helping us on a rainy day.

Dana Rampolla:

Oh, right. Right. Yeah. And we had a wonderful person a Penn employee who geez, I'm drawing a blank Saratoga garage. And one of the people that I miss, because she was the super nice lady, I don't even know her name, but she was that kind of person who always waved every time you went in, I would leave a little bit later in the evenings to try to miss rush hour, and she would still be there just always friendly. It really is. Our parking staff is great.

Angela Hall:

Yeah, we've really, really do emphasize on customer service. So we want to make sure that parking is your first impression of campus, when you come to campus, you're looking for somewhere to park, you're not immediately going to a building. So we want to make sure your first impression and your last impression are those that you'll remember and that you'll enjoy. And Kevin is the one that you're probably mentioning at the Plaza garage, and it may be Fern at the Saratoga garage

Dana Rampolla:

Fern that does sound familiar.

Jena Frick:

So we're mentioning lots of names of garages here right now like Saratoga Plaza. How many garages and lots do we have on campus?

Angela Hall:

We have seven garages and eight lots.

Jena Frick:

Okay, great. And that's definitely going to be helpful once we have a strong influx of people coming back all at the same time this fall, right? We're gonna have students, housing residents, employees coming in daily.

Angela Hall:

Yes. So right now we're experiencing what's called the perfect storm. So with everyone coming back to campus, at the same time, we're inundated by parking applications, which we truly appreciate everyone coming back. But we are asking for a little bit of patience because we do have their your first year students that have to get their parking for the first time we had the dorm students at both Pascault Row and Fayette Square, we have all your part time faculty that are going to start teaching in the fall that have to get their parking situated, we have a lot of people switching to the paid daily program, which is in the Saratoga garage, because they're no longer going to be on campus three days, three or more days a week. So they think it's more advantageous to to get the daily parking. And then you have the people that were hired during the pandemic that didn't get parking at all. And now they're looking for parking. So it is definitely an interesting situation we're going through right now.

Jena Frick:

So can you talk a little bit about how people can apply for a parking spot and how much it costs and what that whole process is like?

Angela Hall:

Oh, sure. So right now, parking for bi weekly deduction is $56 bi-weekly. Our current daily rate at the Saratoga garage is $8. The student rate is $6 a day with a $5 permit. And we also have availability at the Lexington Market rooftop, which we do lease the entire roof top. Now to apply for parking, what you would do to go onto our website unless you're a student. So this is for faculty and staff, you would go on our website and you would need to know your parking liaisons information which is also in our website, complete the new DocuSign form that we had created during the pandemic, which is wonderful. And you would apply for parking. And then once you apply for parking, it's automatically transmitted to the Parking Cashier's Office, you will receive an email to make an appointment with us. We have appointments Monday through

Thursday, from 8:

30 to 4, you come down, pick up your permit, get your one card linked, and you're on your way,

Charles Schelle:

Something that you mentioned earlier about the price. So it sounds like it's a flat rate. In other words, there's no difference in price between garages right?

Angela Hall:

On the UMB campus side, except for the Lexington market rooftop is our discounted program. So all the garages that UMB owns and operates there is a flat biweekly deduction rate except for the Saratoga daily program if you want to be in that particular program.

Charles Schelle:

Great. And I think that's, you know, awesome to point out and awesome to have really here at UMB because I remember, you know back going into college parking was probably one of the more complicated things because every lot would have a different price and structure and every garage. It's nice to remove that thinking, you know for us and make it simple.

Angela Hall:

Yes, it actually It makes it a lot easier that we don't have the different parking programs and a tier levels and everything. Everyone knows that they will be assigned to space on campus, everyone will have a space on campus, and they'll all pay the rate.

Charles Schelle:

If you don't want to drive to campus, you do have that option as a state employee, but it's a little bit different here with the sticker program through the Maryland Transit Administration. Tell me a little bit about the MTA stickers and what that covers.

Angela Hall:

So a couple of years ago, there was a senate and a house bill passed that allowed, you know, universities in the city of Baltimore to obtain what's called an MTA sticker. So what happens is every year there's a sticker distribution that is done is actually all online. So you would go onto our website, go into Alternative Transportation, you would click on the link your if you're an eligible sticker recipient, your information will be automatically populated. And then we will be able to just distribute your sticker through your department, at your school or campus

Charles Schelle:

Share with folks what modes of transportation that covers

Angela Hall:

That actually covers the light rail, all of the Baltimore City MTA programs, and also the subway unfortunately does not cover the MARC train system. We do have the ability to purchase on your behalf the mark train passes and they actually do run from Washington DC all the way to Camden, or Penn Station and we do have ones that come from Aberdeen into the city. And there are some coming out from the west into the city if people prefer.

Charles Schelle:

Yeah, I love the MTA sticker program. I use it myself. I take light rail from Linthicum. It's a very easy commute, easy to walk to campus, and I have my sticker right now I do have to get my new sticker. So where would people pick those stickers up?

Angela Hall:

You pick them up actually from your department. So once you apply, you'll get a notification that your sticker will be ready for pickup by your department. It either through central administration or your different schools.

Charles Schelle:

And they expire at the end of July. Right?

Angela Hall:

Well, currently, the new stickers will actually expire in February of 2022. The MTA is actually looking to revamp the program instead of issuing stickers because normally state employees are issued a state employee ID. UMB we do not have state employee ID so the MTA is looking at a better process instead of stickers. So hopefully we'll know more about that in the coming months.

Charles Schelle:

I can't wait.

Dana Rampolla:

So just to confirm if if I have a sticker, I still have to go on and do a re application similar to when I first applied for a sticker to renew it?

Angela Hall:

Yes, you have to renew your sticker every year and the renewal process is happening right now all departments have their stickers.

Charles Schelle:

So and also to clarify when you said the stickers will expire in February, the 2021 stickers will expire in February or if I received one last year,

Angela Hall:

Your current if you have a gold sticker currently and it says seven of 21 those are expired. The MTA may not let you on the bus if you do continue to ride. So yes, you will need to get the new stickers which are silver, which do have 2 of 22 on them.

Charles Schelle:

Okay, thank you

Jena Frick:

Good to know

Dana Rampolla:

Angela. In addition to those types of transportation options, what do we have here on campus that the university provides?

Angela Hall:

We do have the UMB shuttle that is finally running. Wheels on the ground! Wheels on the bus! However you'd like to say the old Barney song, we are super excited. They're all rebranded you can actually tell they're UMB buses now. Reston Limousine is doing a wonderful job getting those buses out and rolling. So right now, of course students with their student fees, get to ride based on their student fees. Some people call it free, I say they kind of paid for it. Now staff on the other hand do have to pre load their UMB OneCards at the SMC Campus Center at the kiosk to be able to ride so it is $1.75 one way to ride the USB shuttle for staff and faculty.

Dana Rampolla:

That sounds great. And I did see one of the new shirts or not the new shuttle but the new branding on the shuttle it looks terrific. Again, another thing you were able to do in this downtime, I guess, right?

Angela Hall:

Yes, doing the rebranding of the shuttle, again, you know, working on these new programs that we're hoping to start rolling out as well in the coming months.

Dana Rampolla:

So another program you started during the pandemic was the Lyft discount program, correct is can tell us a little bit about that. And if it's still going to be an option once we're back in September,

Angela Hall:

So the Lyft program, there's actually two Lyft programs. One is sponsored by Public Safety, and that is more of a Lyft On Demand program by Public Safety. The one that Parking and Transportation Services did was in lieu of the UMB shuttle. So that one ran base your basic shuttle routes during the pandemic and unfortunately it did end July 31. Because we did bring the shuttle back but it was a really nice program. A lot of students did take advantage of it. Not so many staff because there weren't a lot of staff here, but it was a good program. And I do believe we're going to be looking to some other Lyft programs in the future to kind of, you know, help people get around the city, especially if they missed the bus or something like that maybe kind of like a call on demand system.

Dana Rampolla:

That sounds good. And then the program you were referring to through Public Safety, that's the Safe Ride program. Correct.

Angela Hall:

That's one of the Safe Ride programs. So the public safety does have their own Safe Ride vans, and they have a safe walk program. And then they have a Lyft program as well.

Charles Schelle:

Getting back to garages. There are plenty of I guess, services and options inside of those garages, depending what you need for hybrid cars or electric cars. Tell me a little bit about the EV charging stations where you can find those Is there a fee for those or time limit?

Angela Hall:

So we do have Eb charging stations in every garage, we actually just installed some more in the Plaza Garage and in the Lexington Garage as well. We are excited that we had some more availability on the electrical infrastructure to be able to do so there is no fee at this time to use those. However, we do ask please only stay there for for four and a half hours charge your car and please move as other people do need to charge the car. And I stress a lot with a lot of people that if someone comes to campus and is on electrical E they need to charge their car and have all the stations are taken up for eight to 10 hours they're not able to charge your vehicle to someone actually vacates that space. But currently right now it is no charge.

Jena Frick:

We're talking about the garages and all the parking spaces that people can utilize through Parking and Transportation. But you guys also offer other services like flat tire services and lockout services, even ice scrapers. Can you tell us a little bit more about that?

Angela Hall:

Yes. So our Penn Parking contractors actually have a program. So for instance, if you lock yourself out of your car, we do have what's called a lockout service, where you would contact either the greeters at the entrance of each garage, or you would call our phone number, and we would get someone to come over to you. And they would actually help you get into your car. We do ask for ID of course to make sure it is your vehicle. But we do provide that service we provide flat tire assistance. We do not plug your tires, however we can put air in your tires. We also have ice scrapers, we have salt if you need some salt or windshield washer fluid. And we also have umbrellas. So when the rainy months we do have some umbrellas throughout campus that we will lend out and they actually do come back.

Jena Frick:

Wow, great! That's really good to know for me because I feel like anytime it rains, I forget to put my umbrella in my car.

Charles Schelle:

So how would I, I guess, dial an umbrella ? Like how does that work?

Angela Hall:

So what you would do is you'd go to the entrance of each garage. Some we have some that have lobbies, some that don't you just go and ask if there's any available umbrellas. And if there is they'll say here's your umbrella.

Charles Schelle:

Oh!

Jena Frick:

Hmm! Do you also have like jumper cable services as well? Or is it ...?

Angela Hall:

Yes, so we have what's called a hot shot. So we actually have a battery that we carry around that actually can help jump your jump your car with a hot shot. And we don't do it from car to car. So it's an actually a portable battery unit we use.

Jena Frick:

Oh, that's so good to know, I've had multiple instances where I've accidentally left a light on in my car. Yeah.

Angela Hall:

And another nice feature we do have is we actually will help you find your car if you do misplace it. We do have instances, especially with people visiting the medical center that they'll forget where they parked and they did not take their white spitter ticket, which actually has the garage location on it. And they'll forget where they parked their car. So usually with a little bit of coaxing of where they may have made a left or a right, we are able to find people's cars on campus as well.

Charles Schelle:

Maybe we need to start doing like the Disney system where we have like a Disney character on each level. So they can remember they parked at Simba.

Jena Frick:

But it can be like our core values instead or something

Angela Hall:

Actually, if you go into Plaza garage is actually done that way. We do have different levels with different symbols. And it's actually just got repainted and redone. And all of our garages are actually undergoing a whole rebranding of sorts where every level has a different graphics package on it now.

Charles Schelle:

Well, that's great.

Jena Frick:

Yeah.

Dana Rampolla:

And parking is also very conscientious about the environment. You're using QR codes now instead of the little business cards that were on each floor. And people can scan those,

Angela Hall:

Yes it's wonderful on those. Yes, it's wonderful. When we used to use the garage locator cards, which actually indicated each level by color and location, they would end up all over the ground, and we'd have to clean them up. It's not very pleasant. We try to maintain our garages at peak performance and make them well lit and everything. And so we worked with communications to do QR codes. And we make QR code signs where you can just either hold your smartphone up to the QR code or take a picture of the sign and you'll remember what level and what garage you park that. That's that's

Jena Frick:

I really small anecdote. I really wish they had that at JMU where I went to undergrad because there was one time where I had thought that I had parked my car in one garage and I got out of work that night, went to go get in my car and walked the entire garage up and down looking for my car and me thinking that my car was stolen until I realized that I parked it in a completely different one.

Angela Hall:

Yes, that actually that does happen. We do have people that park in the thought, they parked in one garage, they are really in another garage. But yeah, the QR codes. Because most people do have smartphones now. And it makes it very convenient. And also part of our sustainability efforts we do we actually have an electric vehicle that we use for ou aintenance of our garages. So e people might see it zippi g around campus. It's a litt e green and white, little bug y that we use with all our shove s and buckets and everything n it. So we're working even thou h it's parking and everyone driv s and we need parking and stuff n campus, we try to be s sustainable as possibl

Jena Frick:

So speaking of sustainability, if I wanted to bike to campus, rather than taking my car, what kind of services do you offer for bikers?

Angela Hall:

We do have a bike cage, which is located in the press street garage, which is actually a locked facility, you can actually join that program. Go ahead, apply, you'll have a swipe card to get in and out of it. And you'll be able to park your bike and there's a fixit station inside of that. Also, you'll have access to the URecFit showers, which are in the same building on the top level.

Charles Schelle:

I know this program is in part of UMM Parking Transportation services, but scooters are very popular in Baltimore city. Are people allowed to to use scooters through campus? Is there any where do you know of that are restricted for use? Because I know when the apps that they'll show you some areas that you can't park a scooter or you shouldn't be riding it and in certain areas.

Angela Hall:

Yes. So with with the scooter program, we are working with the City of Baltimore, with their agreement that they just finalized. So we do allow scooters on campus. It is called geofencing is where you're allowed to park and not drop your scooters. So we're working with the City of Baltimore on our geo fencing on campus. We do ask when people are using scooters not to dump them in the middle of sidewalks, they are allowed to be docked in central locations, especially around our bike, usually around the bike racks, you could park them alongside certain buildings. But we are going to be working with the City of Baltimore.

Charles Schelle:

That's great news.

Dana Rampolla:

So Angela, you have shared a lot of information with us today how as an employee or as a student, how can I find information or if I forget something or just want to find out more about what you've said, What are my best resources for parking communications?

Angela Hall:

We have a couple of resources. We actually use our website, which is updated constantly on especially on the main page on their news and alerts brings you the most up to date information that we have. Also within our website, we do have separate areas for alternative transportation, staff and faculty and student parking, and also all our parking forums and our policies and procedures. So that's at umaryland.edu/parking. We also use The Elm. And I encourage everyone please read The Elm every Monday. We have our own section in the album, we're constantly putting updated information, we also communicate through campus live weekly, and all the electronic e-boards in each garage.

Dana Rampolla:

And how about any kind of alerts? I know we have the general University alerts, where would we get parking? Or how would we get parking specific alerts.

Angela Hall:

So we started over the during the pandemic, actually with the alert system and you can text UMB transport to 888777. And you can actually get on time traffic alerts from us around the campus prosper. And also if there's anything happening on campus, we do send you a text it is a totally opt in system. But we encourage everyone to go ahead and opt in for it.

Dana Rampolla:

And do does the parking department use any social media?

Angela Hall:

Yes, we use Facebook and Twitter and we're constantly wanting more subscribers and more readers who are Twitter and Facebook and they're all UMB Parking and Transportation and UMB parking and transport on the Twitter.

Charles Schelle:

I've learned so much about parking. I was one of those pandemic hires, who didn't sign up for parking. But it sounds like I should be ready to and might be losing my spot at this point because of so many applications. So thank you so much to Angela Hall for coming in and sharing with us all that great parking information.

Angela Hall:

Thank you for having me.

Charles Schelle:

We have our first Pulse fan, everybody. Someone wrote in to our mailbag! We should give them a nickname. Pulse pals? Pulsinators? Maybe Pulsars?

Jena Frick:

I love pulse pals. All you Pulse Pals out there listening. Thanks for tuning in. Thanks for writing into our mailbag.

Charles Schelle:

Are you channeling a little Carole Baskin?

Jena Frick:

Oh my gosh! Hey, all you cats and kitten

Charles Schelle:

Cool cats and kittens.

Jena Frick:

Hey, all you Pulse Pals - thanks for watching!

Charles Schelle:

So Shenq Huey Wong sent in this question. She asks I'm curious about the food trucks close to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Is there any recommendation And then how do we pay for the food to use cash or credit card? Thanks again for the information and have a nice day. Well thank you Shenq! There are food trucks there there they rotate. And I remember I used my card some of them may have the tap and pay to use with your like Google Pay or Samsung Pay Apple Pay. Others I think are cash only. I did order a like a chicken parm sub from one that was surprisingly great because they put ricotta cheese on it, which was a nice delight.

Jena Frick:

Oh, that sounds delicious.

Dana Rampolla:

Yeah, I do remember it's that's a great question. Because the one time the first time that I ever purchased, I did not realize that some of them were cash only and I had to go into the hospital, use a machine get some money out. The guy was super nice. I can't. I think he had lamb and I guess gyros and things like that. But um, but yeah, I didn't have any idea. So kudos to Shenq for asking an important question.

Jena Frick:

Yeah. And then another option if the food trucks, you know, you're not interested in a food truck or you need something else. There's also the farmers market that's always available on Tuesdays from 10am to 2pm at University Park Plaza, on the corners of Paca And Baltimore streets.

Charles Schelle:

They also accept SNAP benefits their EBT cards and Women, Infants and Children vouchers, better known as WIC. You can find a link in this episode to the farmers market page, which includes the list of current vendors.

Dana Rampolla:

We love hearing from our pulse listeners. If you have a question visit umaryland.edu/pulse and you can submit your questions on the page and we'll respond to them on air.

Charles Schelle:

Jena, you mentioned before in the podcast that you were taking classes at the Carey School of Law, and you had to finish a paper. How did that go?

Jena Frick:

Well, I got it all done. Made it to 20 pages. Yep, had footnotes with all my research and sources that I had to pull together. I somehow remembered how to do a bibliography and work cited page. So yeah, if you haven't been flashbacks, right, if you haven't been in school for a very long time, it's hard to imagine like tackling all of that again. But somehow that information was still dormant in my brain.

Dana Rampolla:

As an adult, did you feel relieved afterwards? Or did you feel a sense of fulfillment?

Jena Frick:

A little of both. I mean, I it was kind of crazy, because it was so intimidating because the paper was what like 20 pages, it had to be 15 to 20 pages and because I'm an overachiever, I went for 20 once it was finished, and I proof ead it. I was about to turn it n and I just had to like take yself to the top of the page nd just scrolled all the way hrough and like looked at all f that writing that I put ogether and I was like, Oh hank god this is finished just n time for me to take my other inal exam.

Charles Schelle:

Did you pass?

Jena Frick:

Well we will find out next week when the grades come out. But if if all goes according to plan, I will have a 4.0 in the MSL program. So finger crossed!

Dana Rampolla:

Congratulations, that's awesome!

Charles Schelle:

What's MSL?

Jena Frick:

Master of Science and law so I'm taking the Homeland Security and crisis management a program for the Master of Science in Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law

Charles Schelle:

Good luck!

Dana Rampolla:

Well, being a student during the pandemic c n present some special challeng s I'm sure so our next episo e will feature Assistant Vi e President of Student Affai s Patty Alvarez. Patty will ta k about programs and servic s offered for our studen s upcoming in-person events a d even mor

Charles Schelle:

Sounds like it's time to go back to school shopping. Can't wait to talk to Patty and thanks again to Angela Hall from Parking and Transporta ion Services for coming on the s ow. Remember to read and review the UMB pulse on Apple podca ts. Thanks for listening to the UMB Pu

Jena Frick:

The UMB pulse wit Charles Schelle, Dana Rampolla nd Jena Frick is a UMB Office f Communications and Publ c Affairs production. Edited by Charles Schelle, s und engineering by Jena Fr ck marketing by Dana Rampolla Mu ic by No Vibe. Recorded in the University of Maryland Balti ore Community Engagement Cen

Show Open
Moment of UMB Zen
Pulse Check
Parking and Transportation Challenges & Initiatives
How Parking Works at UMB
Remembering Where You Parked
Electric Scooters
Parking Communications
Mailbag
Episode 5 Teaser